Category Archives: Great Uighur Empire

Posts discussing the Great Uighur Empire as discussed by James Churchward

Where Are the Turks in The Lost Continent of Mu?

While researching information for my upcoming book on the Great Uighur Empire, I ran across an article entitled “The Ancient Uighur (Uygur) Empire” by Dr. Haluk Berkmen. According to the page information, it was last updated in April 2009.

The article begins: “The present work is an investigation into the forgotten past. Its goal is to bring into light the ancient civilization that existed many thousand years ago and which is not mentioned in any history book.”

In the fifth paragraph, he unveils where he believes where this cradle of civilization originated, Central Asia, according to ‘linguists worldwide.’ The next paragraph indicates his investigation for this ancient civilization starts in Asia and the proto-language (read Sun Language) spoken there.

The next portion identifies the ancient civilization as the Ancient Uygur Empire, the Empire of the Sun and tentatively dates it to 20,000 years BP. His source, James Churchwald, British military officer and author of books on the Lost Continent of Mu (at least he was consistent, all six mentions are misspelled the same way.) He even includes quotes and the map of the Great Uighur Empire from the Lost Continent of Mu Motherland of Men

Map of the Great Uighur Empire

At one point, the narrative steers away from what James really wrote. Berkmen relates:

“Note that the Turks were also known under the name Mu. Therefore, the lost Mu Empire claimed by James Churchwald was another name given to the imperial nomads of Asia.”

The author’s intent becomes clear when he states:

“Recognizing this situation we will adopt the name Uighur as a generic name for these genetically, culturally and linguistically connected people. The history of these people is the history of humanity, the history of the Forgotten Past.”

To sum up his theory, the beginning of civilization on earth was created by Turks in Central Asia.

How does this stack up to what James wrote?

Does the word ‘Turk’ appears in James’ works?
A search of all James’ published English-language works (excluding the 1927 Books of the Golden Age,) reveals no use of the word, Turk; however, there is one use of a word with those four letters in sequence, Turkestan, as shown below:

TIBET —Tibet lies in Central Asia. It is bounded on the east by China, on the north by Mongolia, on the south by India, and on the west by Kashmir and Turkestan. The Gobi Desert is a part of the northern boundary. Tibet was once a part of the great Uighur Empire. This was before the mountains were raised. The country then was flat and fertile. Now it is one of the highest plateaus in the world with masses of high mountain ranges, most of which run from a westerly to an easterly direction. In the south is the highest mountain range in the world—the Himalayas. Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain, is in this range and lies within the boundaries of Tibet. Tibet has been called “the roof of the world.”
Children of Mu page 221

Does James refer to the Uighur Empire as the Empire of Mu?
In the 1926 Lost Continent of Mu Motherland of Men, James writes:

The Uighur was the principal colonial empire belonging to Mu at the time of the biblical “Flood,” which destroyed its eastern half.

James also writes about several other colonies, including the Naga, Caucasian, Egyptian, Hindu and Maya colonies. This basic theme is continued throughout his other works as well; Mu was the Garden of Eden where mankind first appeared. Therefore, in James theories it is clear, Mu was not another name given to the Uighur.

Does James refer to the Uighurs as Turks?
Since the word ‘Turk’ does not appear in James’ works, it would be difficult to support this assertion. In three different works, James calls his Uighur as the forefathers of the Aryan race. Quoting from the Children of Mu:

The Uighurs were all of a light complexion, milk-white skins, with varying color of eyes and hair. In the north blue eyes and light hair predominated. In the south were found those with dark hair and dark eyes.

Obviously, James had subdivisions of his ancient Uighur but called them all Aryan.

A different Uighur Empire Map

In James’ works, the Great Uighur Empire is a colony of his sunken continent of Mu lasting tens of thousands of years and encompassing most of Asia and Europe. Somehow, they end up spreading civilization around the world. Some may be forgiven if they missed the contradiction; James asserts all people came from Mu, his Garden of Eden. If everyone came from the ancient advanced civilization of Mu, who were the people that needed to be civilized? Where did they come from? James’ theory of an advanced civilization (whether it is Turks or Aryans) civilizing the world undermines James basic premise and inserts a paradox. If everybody was from Mu’s great civilization, they cannot meet other people not from Mu, or if people from Mu met other people, then Mu could not be where all the people came from. Furthermore, the use of his theory of ‘spreading civilization’ by either Turkic or Aryan peoples denies indigenous peoples their birthright. And it is wrong.

I have no control over how my great-grandfather’s words are used by others; however, I believe I have every right to point out the fallacies and how his theories are twisted to promote agendas he did not support. I also believe current researchers should abandon the use of unsubstantiated and discredited theories James espoused in the early 20th century; especially when they are used to promote racist and/or mythical nationalistic ideologies.

Please note, links to external articles are meant to provide a starting point for further investigation, should the reader so choose.

Llakoff’s Island – A Challenge Declined

The Great Uighur Empire during the Tertiary Era

The Great Uighur Empire during the Tertiary Era


On May 1st, (2016) I set out a challenge to fellow researchers to answer two questions about James Churchward’s use of the Llakoff Island in his description of the Great Uighur Empire:

  1. Provide the real name of the island (the easy part,) and,
  2. Provide the name of the earliest written account that James may have used as a reference in his description of the island, as well as author’s name, publisher (if known,) and page numbers.

I allowed a month for the answer to be emailed and received no responses.

The first question was answered and posted in a Facebook group and in a comment to the blog posting- it is the Lyakhovsky Islands, also spelled:

  1. Lachow Island from Narrative of an Expedition to Siberia and the Polar Seas (1840) edited by Major Edward Sabine
  2. Laechow Island from The Museum of Foreign Literature, Science And Art Vol X (1840)
  3. Lachoff Island from Overland Through Asia (1870) by Thomas Knox
  4. Ljachoff’s Island from The Voyage of the Vega Around Asia and Europe (1885) by A.E. Nordenskiold
  5. Liachof Island from The Mammoth and the Flood (1887) by Henry H. Howorth
  6. Liakhov Island from the novels Waif of the Cynthia (1885) and César Cascabel (1890) by Jules Verne

The second question, where could James have read about an island made up of the bones and tusks of mammoths and other forest creatures? Or that ice was not involved in the flooding since it would have mashed up all the bones.

The novels by Jules Verne say the islands are made of whale and mammoth bones, but nothing about a flood.

Several of the books listed above quote from the account of Sannikow (Sannikov), a companion of the explorer Hedenstrom,

In quantity, however, these bones increase wonderfully to the northward, and, as Sannikow expresses himself, the whole soil of the first of the Lachow Islands appears to consist of them.
Narrative of an Expedition to Siberia and the Polar Seas

and

In the words of Sannikow, one of Hedenström’s companions, “the first of the Laechow Islands is little more than one mass of mammoth’s bones,” and though for upwards of eighty years the Siberian traders have been bringing over annually large cargoes of them, there appears as yet to be no sensible diminution in the apparently inexhaustible store.
The Museum of Foreign Literature, Science And Art Vol X

In The Living Age Vol. 204 (1895), a story (Treasure Islands in the Polar Sea) discusses the presence of the bones as follows:

We cannot fully answer these questions. It seems probable, however, that great floods of rushing water must poured over these lands, and great invasions of the waters of the ocean must have inundated them. In these tremendous deluges the elephants, rhinoceroses, and buffaloes were destroyed and their carcasses were piled up in heaps in the places where they had congregated to take refuge from the rising waters. When these deluges subsided and the waters retired, the lands were covered with remains of the drowned animals, in some as yet unexplained manner the climate changed and northern Siberia which was formerly a beautiful and verdant region became an icy wilderness and a land of death.

In The Mammoth and the Flood (1887), Howorth states as follows:

So it is clear that at the time when the elephants and trunks of trees were heaped tip together, one flood extended from the centre of the continent to the furthest barrier existing in the sea as it now is. That flood may have poured down from the high mountains through the rocky valleys. The animals and trees which it carried off from above could sink but slowly in the muddy and rapid waves, but must have been thrown upon the older parts of Kotelnoi and New Siberia in the greatest number and with the greatest force, because these islands opposed the last bar to the diffusion of the waters.”

Is there a smoking gun to provide the precise wording? Maybe, but I didn’t find one complete passage to match what James wrote.

It is clear that Howorth in The Mammoth and the Flood wrote about a north-bound flood and also quotes Sannikow about the composition of the islands being comprised of mammoth and other animal bones.
Maybe The Mammoth and the Flood is the smoking gun being sought and the answer to the second question.
Of course, if anyone is interested and comes up with a better answer, I am all ears.

Have a great day.

Research Challenge – Llakoff’s Island

This is a challenge for all the researchers on the hunt for ancient lost civilizations.

In the 1931 Children of Mu, James Churchward refers to the “Llakoff Islands” in the text quoted below from page 219.

“Off from the mouth of the Lena is Llakoff’s Island. This island is composed of the bones and tusks of mammoths and other forest animals which had been swept up from the Mongolian and Siberian plains by the flood and carried to this, their final resting place. In these bones we find a confirmation that no ice accompanied the wave, for had there been, their bodies and bones would have been mashed into a pulp, and as in eastern North America, no remains of them would be found and Llakoff’s Island never formed.”
Children of Mu, page 219

  1. A web search yields references that all point back to this one passage or derivatives, there is no such place with this name.
  2. The text is included as a portion of the chapter on the Great Uighur Empire describing its destruction. The complete chapter’s text can be viewed at http://www.my-mu.com/gue/com.html and even includes a map.
  3. The questions are:
    1. Provide the real name of the island (the easy part,) and,
    2. Provide the name of the earliest written account that James may have used as a reference in his description of the island, as well as author’s name, publisher (if known,) and page numbers.
  4. The winner of the contest will be the holder of the email address that sends the earliest correct answer to both questions. There will be only one contest winner. The contest will remain open for one month (May 2016) and all the responses evaluated. After the evaluation, the My-Mu.com blog will announce the winner. Preliminary research has developed tentative answers; however, that may not be the final word.
  5. The US or Canadian contest winner will receive a signed copy of either of my books Lifting the Veil on the Lost Continent of Mu Motherland of Men or The Stone Tablets of Mu or a one-month access to scanned copies of James Churchward’s scrapbooks. Due to the onerous costs of overseas postage, a winner in another location would be limited to access to the scanned scrapbooks and whatever else we work out. There is no cash value associated with winning the contest.
  6. All entries shall be emailed to contest@my-mu.com and contain easily identifiable answers to the questions in English. Please include your name (or alias) to be included in the announcement of the winner. Please use an alias if you do not wish your name to become public.
  7. The Contest Administrator (Jack Churchward,) may request verification of the answer to the second question via email to request a url to an image of the text from a printed work or the actual text listed online (i.e., you have seen a document I have not.)
  8. The Contest Administrator is the sole arbiter of the results of the contest.