Category Archives: Sunken cities/ruins

Megalithic Monuments of MalibU…

In 1985, Robert Stanley discovered what he believed to be ancient ruins. On his hiking ventures through the Santa Monica Mountains he also saw odd, unnatural rock formations (see Megalithic Monuments of Malibu.)

There are other California sites with Mu or Lemuria connections. Mount Shasta has been linked to Mu for decades. For instance, symbols in books by James Churchward appear in petroglyphs from Castle Craig. And who can forget Abraham J. Mansfield, Keeper of the Plates of Time? The Rosicrucian book, Lemuria The Lost Continent of the Pacific, implies the western half of California are the remains of the continent of Lemuria/Mu. However, none of these other sites have the “Sphinx of Malibu” or the enormous carved heads of Brahma and the Buddha.

The Sphinx of MalibU

Through his research, Stanley discovered the ancient Chumash legend of the First People. They lived in the mountains long before the arrival of the Chumash in 3000 BCE. Most amazingly, the First People came from a civilization called Mu. A catastrophic flood wiped out the continent and people, according to the Chumash legend. In 1993, Stanley was guiding tours to the site under the name of Mystic Mountain Expeditions of Manhattan Beach.

In looking for further information on Chumash history, I came across a Chumash webpage plainly stating “we called ourselves the first people.” My first thought is to allow people to define themselves. Hikers speaking with unnamed experts and rewriting someone else’s history is a non-starter for me.

Obviously, the story of the “Megalithic Monuments of MalibU” is just another cheap rip-off of my great-grandfather’s theories. A familiar-to-some tale sparking a hint of recognition and concurrence. The tale falls apart immediately under critical examination.

Follow-up on the Cueva de Los Tayos (Tayos Cave)

Some time ago, I interviewed Stan Grist to hear his side of the story about the Cueva de los Tayos (Tayos Cave, “Cave of the Oilbirds”.) Some theorists claim the Tayos Cave provides evidence of an ancient advanced civilization. The cave and the stories concocted about it are frequently used to point as proof of the lost continent of Mu. Stan had interviewed the widow of Petronio Jaramillo, a retired Ecuadoran Army Officer. His widow stated she wrote down the fantastic story of advanced civilization and riches in the Tayos Cave as her husband dictated it. He was hoping to add a little something to his retirement (don’t we all?)

Here is the interview:

Pino Turolla is another source of information about the Tayos Cave because he was one of the first non-indigenous visitors. He also spoke directly with Jaramillo. Pino Turolla was born and raised in Istria, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire before World War I. He served in the Italian Army during World War II and later in the British Army. After the war, he studied archaeology in Italy and emigrated to Canada. He began his exploration in South American starting 1966, making many trips to Ecuador and others to Venezuela, Columbia and Peru.

To summarize Jaramillo’s story: the Tayos Cave contains evidence of an ancient advanced civilization, including a library of advanced, ancient knowledge on metal plates and man-made constructions. Turolla provides a complete description in his book, Beyond the Andes – My Search for the Origins of Pre-Inca Civilization on pages 147 through 160 as transcribed from his taped interview with Jaramillo. The images in Jaramillo’s account of the metal library line up with the description of images in Father Crespi’s collection in Cuenca, Ecuador where Major Jaramillo served. Pino Turolla concludes he probably based the metal library in his story on what he saw in Father Crespi’s collection.

The story goes that Juan Moricz became familiar with Jaramillo’s tale. It eventually became known to Erich Von Daniken and found its way into his book, Gold of the Gods. (Von Daniken later acknowledged he never went to the cave and never saw all the wonderful artifacts and evidence he wrote about.) The story had expanded from the original version to include the cave was actually a multi-level city and the inhabitants were known as the Vela, the ancestors of the Lamas of Tibet. The release of his book provoked massive publicity and public interest.

Other than the native Jivaro people that visited the cave twice a year for ceremonial purposes, Pino Turolla and Oswaldo Mora were the some of the first visitors, a week earlier than the Ecuadoran government expedition. As a trained archaeologist, Turolla saw no evidence of advanced man-made construction in the cave. Pick up a copy of Beyond the Andes (pages 184 – 188) to read his firsthand account.

Subsequently in 1976, a highly publicized expedition with Neil Armstrong visited the cave and failed to find the golden library Von Daniken wrote about.

In season 5 episode 6 of the Travel Channel program Expedition Unknown covers Josh Gates’ January 2018 visit to the cave and extended exploration of the cave. The episode name is: Hunt for the Metal Library and provides a great amount of video of the inside of the cave.

The evidence indicates the cave identified as Cueva de los Tayos by the Jivaro people and subject of the fanciful tales of Jaramillo, Moricz, and Von Daniken is a natural cave. There is no library of metal plates and no evidence of man-made construction (except for the ladders used by the Jivaro people to obtain the Tayos birds for their bi-annual ceremonies.)

Pino Turollo also visited Cuenca, Ecuador to speak with Padre Crespi to view his artifacts and the metal library in his collection. Soon to be covered in this blog as Father Crespi and the Lost Continent of Mu.

Suspect Research website

As mentioned before, I occasionally receive emails with proof of my great-grandfather’s theories.
The link contained in a recent email appeared odd.
As shown below, the title of “Bullfinch Mythology” just doesn’t mix with the subtitle, “Stories of a Great Flood in Polynesia and Micronesia.”

Bullfinch’s Mythology is a 19th century classic, but I didn’t remember reading a chapter about flood myths. Given the benefit of the doubt, I’ll accept that it is probably an error.

The next lower title on the webpage is the title of chapter 13 of volume number 1 of “Folk-Lore In The Old Testament: Studies In Comparative Religion Legend And Law.” The three volumes by Scottish folklorist James George Frazer published in 1918 and not as well known as “The Golden Bough” which was first published in 1890.
One wonders why part of the title is missing?
Where are the notes contained in the original?

Further investigation was hampered when I attempted to navigate to another page for more data. My browser found a redirect command there and stopped the visit.
As far as I am concerned, that was strike three. I know where the original text is located and there is zero risk involved in accessing that text.
I do not know what games they are playing and I do not have to join.
Therefore, I will not provide a direct link to the website, proceed at your own risk.

I’ll put an examination of Frazer’s flood myths on my to-do list…