Category Archives: Great Uighur Empire

Posts discussing the Great Uighur Empire as discussed by James Churchward

Research Challenge – Llakoff’s Island

This is a challenge for all the researchers on the hunt for ancient lost civilizations.

In the 1931 Children of Mu, James Churchward refers to the “Llakoff Islands” in the text quoted below from page 219.

“Off from the mouth of the Lena is Llakoff’s Island. This island is composed of the bones and tusks of mammoths and other forest animals which had been swept up from the Mongolian and Siberian plains by the flood and carried to this, their final resting place. In these bones we find a confirmation that no ice accompanied the wave, for had there been, their bodies and bones would have been mashed into a pulp, and as in eastern North America, no remains of them would be found and Llakoff’s Island never formed.”
Children of Mu, page 219

  1. A web search yields references that all point back to this one passage or derivatives, there is no such place with this name.
  2. The text is included as a portion of the chapter on the Great Uighur Empire describing its destruction. The complete chapter’s text can be viewed at http://www.my-mu.com/gue/com.html and even includes a map.
  3. The questions are:
    1. Provide the real name of the island (the easy part,) and,
    2. Provide the name of the earliest written account that James may have used as a reference in his description of the island, as well as author’s name, publisher (if known,) and page numbers.
  4. The winner of the contest will be the holder of the email address that sends the earliest correct answer to both questions. There will be only one contest winner. The contest will remain open for one month (May 2016) and all the responses evaluated. After the evaluation, the My-Mu.com blog will announce the winner. Preliminary research has developed tentative answers; however, that may not be the final word.
  5. The US or Canadian contest winner will receive a signed copy of either of my books Lifting the Veil on the Lost Continent of Mu Motherland of Men or The Stone Tablets of Mu or a one-month access to scanned copies of James Churchward’s scrapbooks. Due to the onerous costs of overseas postage, a winner in another location would be limited to access to the scanned scrapbooks and whatever else we work out. There is no cash value associated with winning the contest.
  6. All entries shall be emailed to contest@my-mu.com and contain easily identifiable answers to the questions in English. Please include your name (or alias) to be included in the announcement of the winner. Please use an alias if you do not wish your name to become public.
  7. The Contest Administrator (Jack Churchward,) may request verification of the answer to the second question via email to request a url to an image of the text from a printed work or the actual text listed online (i.e., you have seen a document I have not.)
  8. The Contest Administrator is the sole arbiter of the results of the contest.

Looking for the Great Uighur Empire Capital Part 5

To repeat the question from the end of Part 4:
See also Part 1 or Part 2 or Part 3.

So, according to the newspaper article and the works of James Churchward, the ancient Uighurs of 70,000 years ago had their capital at Khara Khoto, but where is this capital in relationship to the historical Great Uighur Empire/Khaganate (744-840)?
A map is shown below that represents the territory under the control of the Uighur Kagans.

Map of Great Uighur Empire/Khaganate

Map of Great Uighur Empire/Khaganate

The Uighur leaders also had an affinity for the Orkhon Valley and built their capital at Ordu Baliq or Karabalghasun, less than 18 miles away from the city that would one day become the capital of the Mongol Empire, Karakhorum.

Capital of the Great Uighur Empire - Ordu Baliq

Capital of the Great Uighur Empire – Ordu Baliq

The map below, presented previously, again provides some perspective about the distances involved.
3ks-midrange

Views of the ancient cities with the same scale
Capital of the Great Uighur Empire - Ordu Baliq

Capital of the Great Uighur Empire - Ordu Baliq

Karakhorum Capital of the Mongol Empire

Karakhorum lies to the north of Erdeene Zuu monastery

Khara Khoto (1032-1374)

Khara Khoto (1032-1374)

Looking for the Great Uighur Empire Capital Part 4

To repeat the question from the end of Part 3:
See also Part 1 or Part 2.

At least one question arises, “How much of this newspaper article can be believed?” For instance, was Khara Khoto really the capital of Chinggis Khan and his grandson Kublai?

First, Temujin was given the title “Chinggis Khan” which can be translated as “Leader of All Who Live in Felt Tents.” He and his people lived in yurts on the grasslands of Inner Asia. When Ogedei succeeded the great Khan, he built the Mongol capital at Karakorum, in the Orkhon Valley.
In the Google Earth map below, Kharakorum is shown to the north of the square and enclosed Erdeene Zuu monastery.

Karakhorum lies to the north of Erdeene Zuu monastery

Karakorum lies to the north of Erdeene Zuu monastery


This was the capital of the Mongol Empire from 1235 to 1260 and later the Northern Yuan in the 14th and 15th centuries.

But how close is Karakorum to Kara Khoto? As shown in the following map, they are not very close (about 385 miles).
Kararahorum_to_Karakhoto

So maybe the article (and James Churchward) did not get it right about the city of Kara Khoto being a city of Chinggis Khan, but what about his grandson, Kublai? Kublai lived in Karakorum until he became the 5th Mongol Empire Kagan and finished conquering the Chinese empires. Kublai created the Yuan dynasty and built his capital at Khanbaliq in what is now known as Beijing.

The map below places the different places in perspective – Kara Khoto or the Black City is over 800 miles from Beijing or Khanbaliq. Again, the contents of the newspaper article are called into question.
3ks-midrange

So, according to the newspaper article and the works of James Churchward, the ancient Uighurs of 70,000 years ago had their capital at Kara Khoto, but where is this capital in relationship to the historical Great Uighur Empire/Khaganate (744-840)?

Visit part 5 for that answer.